Disable XML-RPC-API

Mô tả

Protect your website from xmlrpc brute-force attacks,DOS and DDOS attacks, this plugin disables the XML-RPC and trackbacks-pingbacks on your WordPress website.

PLUGIN FEATURES
(These are options you can enable or disable each one)

  • Disable access to xmlrpc.php file using .httacess file
  • Automatically change htaccess file permission to read-only (0444)
  • Disable X-pingback to minimize CPU usage
  • Disable selected methods from XML-RPC
  • Remove pingback-ping link from header
  • Disable trackbacks and pingbacks to avoid spammers and hackers
  • Rename XML-RPC slug to whatever you want
  • Black list IPs for XML-RPC
  • White list IPs for XML-RPC
  • Some options to speed-up your wordpress website
  • Disable JSON REST API
  • Hide WordPress Version
  • Disable built-in WordPress file editor
  • Disable wlw manifest
  • And some other options

Need more protection for your website?

Use WP Security Guard to protect your website againts hackers, spammers and bad bots.

WP Security Guard Main Features

  • Anti BruteForce Attack
  • Anti Hack Firewall
  • Security Monitoring
  • Math Captcha & Google reCaptcha
  • Two Factor Authentication
  • File Integrity Monitoring
  • No Captcha Anti Spam
  • And More…

Learn more about WP Security Guard

What is XMLRPC

XML-RPC, or XML Remote Procedure Call is a protocol which uses XML to encode its calls and HTTP as a transport mechanism.
Beginning in WordPress 3.5, XML-RPC is enabled by default. Additionally, the option to disable/enable XML-RPC was removed. For various reasons, site owners may wish to disable this functionality. This plugin provides an easy way to do so.

Why you should disable XML-RPC
Xmlrpc has two main weaknesses

  • Brute force attacks:
    Attackers try to login to WordPress using xmlrpc.php with as many username/password combinations as they can enter. A method within xmlrpc.php allows the attacker to use a single command (system.multicall) to guess hundreds of passwords. Daniel Cid at Sucuri described it well in October 2015: “With only 3 or 4 HTTP requests, the attackers could try thousands of passwords, bypassing security tools that are designed to look and block brute force attempts.”
  • Denial of Service Attacks via Pingback:
    Back in 2013, attackers sent Pingback requests through xmlrpc.php of approximately 2500 WordPress sites to “herd (these sites) into a voluntary botnet,” according to Gur Schatz at Incapsula. “This gives any attacker a virtually limitless set of IP addresses to Distribute a Denial of Service attack across a network of over 100 million WordPress sites, without having to compromise them.”
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